Deirdre Childress Hopkins explores the world, entertainment and sports

Here is a link to one of my fave Oscar stories.

It’s all about the gowns.

Here is a link to the 50 Best Oscar Dresses as selected by the Hollywood Reporter – http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/gallery/50-best-oscar-dresses-422169#51

I think they blew it a bit because even if folks don’t like Cher’s style sense – she is on my best list because she is MEMORABLE. They threw her in the worst list of course, but for me, you can’t beat a full black headdress: http://money.cnn.com/galleries/2008/fsb/0804/gallery.feathers.fsb/3.html

 

And here is their gallery of the worst – http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/gallery/worst-oscar-dresses-ever-421781

I commend the judges for the selection of Paltrow’s pink, the cups are not filled dress, as well as the love they gave her on the Best Dressed side when she was Brad Pitt’s arm candy.

And of course there was Jennifer Hudson in that hideous brown. I think that helped her seriously do the Weight Watchers campaign.

And dare I say it? I often question Meryl Streep’s fashion sense, but never her acting.

 

 

 

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Deirdre C. Hopkins, Dr. Ahati Toure, Dr. Candice Love Jackson, Dr. Jerry Ward Jr. and actress Tiffany.

Deirdre C. Hopkins, Dr. Ahati Toure, Dr. Candice Love Jackson, Dr. Jerry Ward Jr. and actress Tiffany.

Whether Quentin Tarantino’s film, Django Unchained, should be viewed as a realistic or mythological portrayal of slavery in the U.S. dominated a panel discussion Thursday at Delaware State University.

Dr. Jerry Ward, known for his study of the work of Richard Wright, described the film as a very American film, a richly satiric cartoon. He said the filmmaker created a collage to shock the audience, offered moments to glorify in revenge and in some ways added to the romance of slavery.

Dr. Candice Love Jackson described the character of Kerry Washington as Broomhilda von Shaft as connected to the blaxploitation film legend John Shaft andshe  looked at the film in the context of Tarantino’s handling of other heroines played by Uma Thurman and Pam Grier in such films as Pulp Fiction.

Several actresses, one on the panel and others in the audience of more than 100 people, debated their conflicts about roles that are offered but fall outside of the acceptable characters that might uplift or improve perceptions of African Americans. I was able to tie this point back to The Help and the difficulties Viola Davis faced first in accepting the role and finally in the Academy of Motion Pictures inability to reward her for that performance.

My presentation focused on the history of film as studied by Tarantino, his focus on spaghetti Westerns, blood, gore and language. The N-word is inescapable in this film. I distributed a quiz on African American film quotes and again, language is part of our relationship to film.

Dr. Marshall Stevenson of Del State set the tone for the discussion along the themes of sex and violence and how they are intertwined with American history. To them, I would add RACE.

This Thursday, the Delaware State University College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences will offer a panel discussion on the controversial film, Django Unchained, by Quentin Tarantino and starring Jamie Foxx.Jamie

The event – entitled “Django Unchained: Myths and Realities of Slavery in the Old South” — is free and open to the public at 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 7 in the Education & Humanities Theatre on campus.

This is a topic that I hope provokes a lot of discussion. As a film editor at the Philadelphia Inquirer for five years, I grew to not only understand why it is so important to support African Americans in cinema, but to embrace opportunities to discuss how our culture is often held to the standard of one speaker, one view – the monolith. This discussion, just before the Oscars, will give us the opportunity to consider how the story is told and by whom.

Join us if you can!

More info: http://www.desu.edu/news/dsu-host-feb-7-panel-discussion-film-django

This week, I will spend some times with my friends from MATPRA, the Mid-Atlantic Tourismp-Public Relations Alliance.

I love this group and plan to take a few fam tours around an area that is close to home but largely unexplored by me.

Stay tuned!

 

 

I love food, I love reporting about celebrities.

But getting this Q and A done was a bit tougher than I imagined. Call it image control.

Anyway, here are her answers about burgers. One reader said that at the calorie intake some of the recipes are not that healthy. But I still think a meal made at home is better than a fast-food meal.

http://www.philly.com/philly/restaurants/20120607_Q_and_A_with_Rachael_Ray_on_her_new_burger_cookbook.html

Tonight at 7, the Philadelphia Association of Black Journalists, with the Temple Association of Black Journalists present: Monitoring Hollywood IV, “Beyond the Stereotypes: Black Movie Stars and the Oscars.”

Join moderator Annette John-Hall and panelists Deirdre M. Childress of The Philadelphia Inquirer, Mike Dennis of Reelblack, Eugene Haynes of Temple University teaching the course African-Americans in Motion Pictures, and Darla Mitchell-Henning of Hyperdrive.com

The event will be at Temple University, Tuttleman Hall Room 103, 1800 N. 13th St. Refreshments will be served.

Not that the announcement is out of the way, let me say that my love of Hollywood stems from being born there. I watched movies and ran into movie stars from when I was a child going to the grocery store, concerts or sporting events with my parents.

Every year, I would plop down in front of the TV and watch the Oscars. I was unaware of the racial implications of some selections until the year of “The Color Purple,” when Spielberg was ignored, I was pissed.

So come out tonight and talk movies. We all have a story to tell.

 

 

Deirdreone's Blog

So my friend Monica Peters sat down with actor Michael Ealy this week and asked some questions you might not expect. She stayed away from ‘who are you dating?’ But she got him to talk about relationships – clue: He likes honesty.

See it on youtube:

 

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